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View online: https://www.brightwells.com/lot-details/486513

Key Information

Lot number
94
Sale Price
£8,344
Make & Model
Bedford VYC shooting break
Registration
OD 2874
Year
2020
Colour
Engine Size
2,048 cc
Chassis No.
150067
Engine No.
300082
Documents
V5C only

Full Description

1932 Bedford VYC Shooting Brake

SOLD £8,344

Restored and extremely smart pre-war Bedford; lusty 2.1 ohv straight-six engine; ideal for shooting parties; lots of recent work; fun for the extended family; one of only a handful surviving; transferable number

Established in 1930, Bedford Vehicles was a subsidiary of Vauxhall Motors (itself the British subsidiary of General Motors), that was dedicated to the production of commercial vehicles. A key part of the GM Europe operation, the Bedford brand proved hugely popular and their range of lorries and light commercial vehicles established an enviable reputation for sturdiness and reliability. Hardly surprising as they used Chevrolet-developed chassis and drivetrains that had been proven in the vast open spaces of 1920s America. The VYC 12cwt van was launched in 1932 and featured a 2.1-litre version of the famous Chevrolet Stovebolt-6, a rugged overhead valve straight-six with a pressure lubricated crankshaft in four main bearings. Smooth, flexible and quiet, it produced a healthy 42bhp at 3,300rpm and was mated to a three-speed gearbox which gave it a top speed of 60mph. Based on the contemporary Vauxhall VY Cadet 17hp saloon, it was good to drive and had a spacious load area that made it a popular choice with delivery drivers and small businesses. Only in production for three years, it was replaced by the 20hp BYC in 1935. First registered in Devon in June 1932, this particular VYC looks most impressive and has clearly been well restored at some point in the not-too-distant past. There is no history with the vehicle but we suspect that the shooting brake body is probably of fairly modern construction and has been very well executed. Our vendor acquired the vehicle from Kent in June last year, sight unseen and on the strength of a verbal description over the phone. When it arrived in Lancashire he was very happy with the appearance of the vehicle but discovered a few minor issues that had not been declared. An experienced engineer well used to working on vintage vehicles, he set about a thorough overhaul to bring it up to the standard that he required. This included redoing much of the wiring to get all the electrics working properly (lights, indicators, wipers, horn, starter, dynamo etc) and an overhaul of the braking system including new split pins on all the rods. All the grease points were regreased and the sump was fitted with a new gasket to cure an oil leak. The rear wings and running boards were replaced and a new floor made. Now in super condition throughout, it is said to start easily and to drive as it should. The tyres are all good (including the spare) and it comfortably seats six in the back. Retaining its original (transferable) number OD 2874, it is believed to be one of only around five VYC models remaining and would make a great promotional tool for any business.