1934 Singer Nine Sports

Fully restored over the last few years including rebuilt engine and many new parts; very smart example of this sporting four-seater

From the late 1920s to the mid ‘30s the Singer Car Company made a prolific range of machines and by 1928 had become the third largest car manufacturer in England.

What really set Singer apart was their success in the trials and reliability events of the day, their sports models being thinly disguised competition vehicles that could be driven on the road during the week, but with minimal preparation could also be raced at the weekend. Introduced in 1932, the Nine Sports was typical of the breed and quickly established a formidable reputation on sporting events both at home and abroad.

It was fitted with the same jewel-like 972cc overhead cam engine as the Nine and the Junior, but with various performance tweaks including twin SU carburettors that raised power to around 35bhp and gave it a top speed of some 70mph. The close-ratio gearbox (with optional ‘Perm-Mesh’ clutchless operation) made it especially suited to trials work where maximum speed was not as important as power and acceleration.

Suspension was by half elliptic springs all round with adjustable André Hartford shock absorbers, while stopping power came courtesy of Lockheed 10-inch hydraulic brakes front and rear. From 1933 a four-seat version was available, styled by Eric Neale, which had a louvred bonnet and scuttle, cutaway doors, Rudge-Whitworth knock-off wire wheels, sprung steering wheel and Jaeger instruments.

First registered in London in July 1934, this four-seater Sports was acquired by the last-but-one owner in a dismantled state in 2005. He set about a full restoration which included fitting new wings front and rear, new brakes and suspension, a new windscreen, new tyres and a full interior retrim in dark red hide. The radiator was also reconditioned and a new core fitted.

When the restoration was virtually completed, illness intervened and the car was laid up until 2013 when it was acquired by the previous owner via one of our auctions. He lavished much time and money on the car, including getting the carburettors, distributor and steering box rebuilt and the brakes overhauled with many new parts. The wiring was renewed and the Jaeger chronometric speedo and rev counter were rebuilt and an additional temperature gauge was fitted behind the gear stick. A new hood, hood cover and tonneau were also fitted. The engine was also fully rebuilt when the crankshaft snapped while attending a rally in France in 2016, since when the car has only covered a few hundred miles.

Our vendor acquired the car two years ago, again via Brightwells, and has used it only sparingly, reporting that it runs and drives well. It has certainly been starting promptly and running very sweetly as we have moved it around on site, with good 30psi oil pressure at tick-over.

Documentation includes a good file of bills charting the works carried out to date, an old green log book from 1967 when the car was in Reigate, owner’s handbook, workshop manual, parts catalogue plus other technical literature about the model.

These lovely little sportscars are great fun to drive and this freshly rejuvenated example, which retains its original (transferable) number plate, looks mighty tempting at the guide price suggested.

For more information contact James on 07970 309907 or email james.dennison@brightwells.com

Reg No: HV4118
Chassis Number: 61741
Engine Number: S.55395
Engine Size: 972cc
Docs: V5C; copies of older V5s; green logbook from 1967; one old MOT; restoration invoices; owner's handbook; workshop manual etc.

Sale Section & Buyers Premium (ex VAT): Car 12%, Minimum £150

Estimate: £15,000-17,000

Lot 55

Lot ended

Wednesday 30/03/2022

Hammer Price (inc. buyers premium)

£14,560
Auction details and terms
  • Put in your highest bid you would be prepared to go to.
  • Bidding at the last moment may leave you disappointed. Any earlier bid is always taken first, so doing this may only push someone else up and prevent you from becoming the highest bidder.
  • No bids can be placed once the time remaining ends, therefore do not delay.