1965 Auto Union DKW Munga

Potential for some alternative fun; 1,000cc two-stroke petrol engine; runs and drives with manual, parts booklet and other info - be different?

This unusual vehicle hails from the AutoUnion era (which became Audi) and falls under the DKW brand, known as the ‘Munga’ which comes from the German phrase “Mehrzweck Universal Geländewagen mit Allradantrieb” – translating as “multi-purpose universal off-road car with all-wheel drive” – quite a mouthful, no wonder they stuck with Munga.

Dating from January 1965 this unusual, later model vehicle (built 1956 – 1968) has been registered in the UK since February 2021 and features a 1000cc two-stroke petrol engine with four-speed manual ‘box. The history file here includes only the V5C showing our vendor as the only UK owner, some parts booklets and a manual.

The car has its battle scars from its 57 years (as pictured) but fundamentally looks sound enough for some fun. Bought in big numbers by the German Border Police, Nato and Dutch military in period, they are seldom seen these days, despite some 46,750 being produced.

A groovy alternative to a Willys Jeep or old Land Rover, they were famed for being tough as old boots with a genuine ‘go-anywhere’ capability, and were widely adopted in West Germany for use in agriculture and forestry. 

Give it some love, sort the canvas roof out and the engine's tendency to rev itself when running (as we found) the truck started, drove and stopped sufficiently for us to take these images and video feeling surprisingly eager and nimble. With the zingy two-stroke sound track and smell, there’s lots to be excited about here if you like to be different.

For more information contact - [email protected]

Reg No: JWE435C
Chassis Number: 3039005342
Engine Size: 1000
Docs: V5C; workshop manual; parts list; sales info; MOT exempt

Sale Section & Buyers Premium (ex VAT): Car 12%, Minimum £150

Estimate: £3,000-5,000

Lot 120

Lot ended

Wednesday 14/09/2022

Hammer Price (inc. buyers premium)

£3,360
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